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From NYTimes.com
The move by Jesuit priests is the largest such effort by the Roman Catholic Church and comes amid growing calls for reparations across the United States.
From Smithsonianmag.com
The public website draws connections between existing datasets to piece together fragmentary narratives that were previously difficult to sew together.
From CNN.com
Researchers unearthed a slave quarters site at Newtowne Neck State Park, which was once the site of a Jesuit plantation in southern Maryland. The slave quarters may date back to the 1700s. The site may also have a connection to Georgetown University's history of slave trading.
From SmithsonianMag.com
Archaeologists conducting excavations at a Jesuit plantation in Maryland have unearthed roughly 300-year-old buildings that housed enslaved workers, reports McKenna Oxenden for the Baltimore Sun. Researchers are working with the descendants of enslaved people seeking to document their family histories.
From STLToday.com
Four years into an ongoing research effort, officially called the “Slavery, History, Memory and Reconciliation Project,” about 70 people have been identified so far, who, between 1823 and 1865, were mainly forced to work at the university, its church and St. Stanislaus Seminary.
From NYTimes.com
In 1838, the Jesuit priests who ran the country’s top Catholic university needed money to keep it alive. Now comes the task of making amends as they confront a particularly wrenching question: What, if anything, is owed to the descendants of slaves who were sold to help ensure the college’s survival?